Blog Archives

Tips For Healthy Kids

March 15, 2017

Thank you to Wendy Dessler for this guest post on tips for healthy kids.

Tips for Healthy Kids | motherscircle.netWe all want healthy, well-balanced children. We want them to enjoy physical activity and we want to provide them with foods to fuel their bodies and minds.

Unfortunately, we live in an instant world where snacks are loaded with sugars, fats, and just enough nutritional value to earn a government okay to label them healthy.

Children develop their taste from the foods we give them. They are not mature enough to decide what is good and what is not. Even adults have problems in this area.

Further, how we present something to them can build excitement or dread. This is true with their lifestyles, diets, and special treats.

Help Your Kids Prevent Cyberbullying

August 30, 2016

This is a post and accompanying infographic are contributed to Mother’s Circle by several anti-cyberbullying nonprofits to guide parents in helping our children to prevent cyberbullying.

There’s no way to deny that technology is an important part of modern life. Teens check their social media profiles over one hundred times a day. This is a pretty insanely high number, so, as a parent, you may be worried about what exactly they’re doing while they’re busy tweeting, texting, and snapchatting. A very common concern for parents right now is cyberbullying. How can you protect your kids online? Keep reading for a few tips.

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is similar to the kind of bullying you grew up with, except that it takes place entirely using electronic technology. Sometimes, this bullying comes as a response to something your teenager posted online or did in person, but other times, it’s entirely random. It’s definitely a sad situation to face, but a little bit of education and preparation can help you prevent it from happening again.

Anomynity

Websites like Ask.fm and YikYak allow teens to share their thoughts openly and anonymously. For some, this can be a bit of a freeing activity, but it can quickly lead to disastrous effects. Having an honest conversation about these apps will help your teen make responsible choices about the internet and better understand your point of view.

Be Supportive

If your teen is have trouble with cyberbullying, don’t lay the blame on them. At this point, it doesn’t do any good to remind them of how they could have prevented the bullying from taking place. Instead, be supportive and accepting of their struggles. When they’re feeling a bit better, you can have a discussion about internet safety going forward.

Set An Example

While you’re worrying about your kids having issues with cyberbullying, so are plenty of other parents. Talk to your children about how to not become cyberbullies themselves. Remind them that everything they put on the internet is permanent, and that they could seriously hurt someone with their words.

Honesty

Honesty is the best policy. Tell your kids that cyberbullying didn’t exist when you were their age, but that doesn’t mean you can’t help them with it. In order to work with your kids on this issue, they have to trust you. If you pretend to know lots about technology, they’ll quickly lose this trust. Be honest- admit when you don’t know the answer to something, then go and figure it out together. [Honesty is one of the keys to parenting with confidence in the Naked Parenting series.]

Infographic

For younger teens, the infographic below is a great resource to educate them on the risks and benefits of social media use, especially as it relates to cyberbullying.

A Child Who Knows She is Loved

November 20, 2014

a child who knows she is loved, Naked Parenting quotes, bleeding heart flowers

We Shouldn’t Engineer Childhood

September 26, 2014

engineer childhood, let kids fail, failures and mistakes as parents, let kids be kids

Giving Kids Our Undivided Attention

August 28, 2014

parenting quotes, Naked Parenting quotes, raising kids with confidence, parenting tips

Naked Parenting Webinar

August 17, 2014

Naked Parenting: 7 Keys to Raising Kids With Confidence

Join me for a Webinar on August 19, 9:00 – 10:00 PM EDT

I’ll present the 7 Keys to Raising Kids with Confidence and answer questions. You’ll leave the webinar with practical tips you can start using right away.

Register now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/354589086

Naked Parenting is parenting stripped down to the bare basics to focus on seven keys to raising kids who are self-sufficient, confident, respectful, and resilient. In this session, we’ll discuss these seven keys: love, honesty, communication, responsibility, discipline, mistakes and gratitude.

Naked Parenting approaches parenting in an honest, direct and realistic way. Guiding children with love, nurturing their strengths and self image, and instilling personal responsibility are at the heart of this approach.

Title:
Naked Parenting: 7 Keys to Raising Kids With Confidence
Date:
Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Time:
9:00 PM – 10:00 PM EDT

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Kappa Kappa Gamma’s Lifestyle Learning webinar series is open to the public. You are encouraged to share this Kappa-sponsored learning opportunity by forwarding the invitation to others who may be interested. Thank you.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer
Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

top mommy blogs, mommy blog directory,

Naked Parenting – New Parenting Book from Mother’s Circle

July 9, 2014

Naked Parenting book, image Naked Parenting, raising kids with confidence, honest parenting, tips for being confident parent, parent book for teens, parent book for tweens, parenting book for all ages, I’m proud and excited to announce the publication of Naked Parenting: 7 Keys to Raising Kids with Confidence.

Over the thirteen years working with new parents and helping families transition to parenthood, I’ve received many calls and emails from clients, from the immediate postpartum period to years later, asking parenting questions. Many clients and blog readers have asked or suggested I write a book – so here it is!

Naked Parenting is parenting stripped down to the bare basics focusing on seven keys to raising kids who are self-sufficient, confident, respectful, and resilient. Nudity not required.

Naked Parenting describes my parenting principles and philosophies and allows readers to apply these ideas to their own style of parenting using their own household rules and values. I share specific tips, examples and suggestions that families can begin using right away.

It’s a quick read that will leave you ready to try new techniques in your family. One early reader was heading on vacation after finishing Naked Parenting and told me she was going start the next day by focusing on one aspect she’d learned in the book that really resonated with her. Another early reader felt like she was sitting talking with me over a cup of tea as she read it – what a compliment – and I hope you feel that way, too. Pour yourself some iced tea and join me!

I’d love to hear how Naked Parenting impacts your family – use the contact form or share your thoughts in the comments below. As a Mother’s Circle reader, you already know a lot about my writing style and parenting ideologies, and I hope you will enjoy Naked Parenting. Click here to see Naked Parenting on Amazon.

Thank you for your readership and your support!

I’m grateful for the advance praise for Naked Parenting

8 Parenting Lessons from Frozen

June 17, 2014

parenting tips, parenting lessons from Frozen, lessons from the movie Frozen, kids watching Frozen, drawing of Olaf, Olaf the snowmanI know, I know, we’re all “Frozened-Out,” but I had to finally share the parenting lessons from Frozen that I’ve been thinking about. I’m a little delayed in putting these Frozen thoughts to paper – um, to blog post – since I’ve been busy writing a parenting book, Naked Parenting: 7 Keys to Raising Your Kids With Confidence. Details coming soon!

So back to the parenting lessons from Frozen …

How many times have you seen Frozen in your family? Three? Five? Eight? Have you hit a dozen times? How many times have you sung/heard/hummed “Let it Go”? That’s got to be nearing the hundred mark at least! Hasn’t “Let it go” become the new theme song and theme phrase for everything? Don’t stress – let it go – then your head goes right into the lyrics.

Frozen is one of my favorite movies, not just my favorite Disney movie, but I think I have to add it to my list of all favorite movies. And, having seen it more times than I’d like to admit, I can’t help but see some great parenting lessons from Frozen.

1. Accept your children for who they are – and nurture it.

This one hits you right in the face at the start of Frozen. Poor Elsa wasn’t accepted unconditionally, sure, her parents, the rulers of Arendelle, thought they were doing the right thing, but they squelched her essence, even made her ashamed and embarrassed by who she was. Her parents didn’t let her be herself, instead she had to hide her true self.

I cringe to admit it, but there are times we do this as parents, sometimes in small ways that are almost hidden. The key is to recognize it and take a different action course. Do you want your book bug to be more athletic? Do you want your daughter to play field hockey like you did? Do you encourage your art-loving son to join the soccer team? Do you expect A’s from your B student?

Encouraging them to fulfill their potential and offering opportunities for diverse experiences are wonderful but there can be a fine line, can’t there?

In Naked Parenting, Naked Love is the first key – 100% full, generous, crazy-love for our kids and making sure they know it to their core, without a question. Wholly accepting them for who they are, helping them shine in their strengths and learn from and grow from their weaknesses, that’s our job as parents. I think the Frozen trolls are a wonderful example of unconditional love and acceptance.

2. Family first and love conquers all.

Tagging onto the first lesson, sisterly love and bonds are a main Frozen theme. Didn’t you think for awhile that the “only an act of true love can save her” was a kiss from Kristoff? I let the screenwriters take me right along that thinking for most of the film – but then the ultimate lesson was that it was a sister’s love that saved her, not a romantic love.

Confident Parenting

September 16, 2013

confident parenting, 4 seasons, discipline techniques for kids, reward systems for kids, learning to parent, how to parent, parenting tips, help for parents, learning to parentThere are times we parents find ourselves rattled, off our game or plain old stumped, but it’s at those times, we need to seek resources and find our mojo to return to confident parenting. Parenthood begins in pregnancy and evolves as our kids grow.

The main goal in parenting boils down to raising future adults with solid character (however each family defines that). We are raising children with the hope of them becoming happy, resilient, confident, healthy grown-ups ready to face the world.

We find our parenting style in many ways, through trial and error, doing and learning, reading books, websites, blogs, expert opinions, observing other parents, reflecting on how our parents did the job. In the end, even with support of family, friends, teachers and community members, the job is ours and we need to trust ourselves. Trust that we know our children best, trust our ability and trust ourselves to seek out help when we need it.

Parenting is a learned behavior – you can improve, you can develop skills and you can grow and change.

Confident parenting encourages us to both examine ourselves and our habits, and to reject advise we don’t agree with, even if it’s from an “expert” or printed in a book. It’s okay to get comfortable trying stuff out, I loveblowing bubbles, child blowing bubbles, games to play with toddlers, crafts for toddlers, pudgy toddler hand, the idea of building up a parenting “tool bag” with tools gleaned from different sources. Tools can be stories to illustrate an idea, motivational tools, demonstration of a skill, reward charts, discipline techniques, family rituals, morning or bedtime systems, distraction tricks, setting clear limits … anything we use in teaching and guiding our children.

Disciplining Our Kids: The Basics

January 16, 2013

sisters, siblings hugging, girl in yellow dress, sisters as friends, big sister little sister, smiling sisters, Disciplining our kids is not easy. It’s exhausting and frustrating. Disciplining our kids can create feelings of sadness, guilt, anger, impatience and helplessness in the best of parents. But that’s no reason not to take charge and do it.

Discipline has two sides – negative consequences for negative behaviors and positive consequences for good behaviors. I love being able to reward my kids’ good choices in life. Praising and acknowledging the behaviors you want to encourage is the best way to influence and guide your child. However, kids do misbehave. I find in working with and being a parent, it’s dealing with the not-listening, rule-breaking behaviors that’s more challenging so that’s the focus of this post.

As parents, it’s our job to keep our kids safe, to set limits for them, to communicate those limits and to give them reasonable and swift consequences when they break a rule.

The point is learning. Discipline is all about teaching our children how to behave and interact with the world, beginning in our homes.

It can be uncomfortable and flat out not fun to execute time outs or to take away an iPod. It requires endless energy to mold kids behaviors, to determine adequate consequences, then to stick it out and deliver them in a timely way. If our goal is teaching them, it’s wise to follow through on a logical consequence right away so they connect the discomfort with the undesirable behavior.

Knowing exactly what motivates a child gives us a perfect immediate consequence; but that can punish the parent. A long car ride without a gadget may be tough, but if it’s educating our child on the importance of proper conduct, well, then as the parent, we need to see it through however hard it is on us.

It’s difficult to see our kids crying and upset, but we’re the adults and need to bear that discomfort and manage our personal feelings. We need to be the grown-ups and carry that weight for the long term good of our children.

If we back down to relieve our uncomfortable emotions, we are ineffective in parenting. We have only taught our children that they can cry, fuss or tantrum their way out of a sanction. They have not learned to choose the appropriate behavior and the next time, it will be exponentially harder for that parent.

p-_j53ayb9sRH9s